Advertisement

You can sponsor this page

Balaenoptera musculus   (Linnaeus, 1758)

blue whale
Upload your photos and videos
| All pictures | Google image |
Image of Balaenoptera musculus (blue whale)
Picture by FAO

Classification
Mammalia | Cetacea | Balaenopteridae
Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Main reference
Jefferson, T.A., S. Leatherwood and M.A. Webber. 1993. (Ref. 1394)
References | Biblio | Coordinator | Collaborators

Size / Weight / Age
Max length : 3,300 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 99323); max. published weight: 160.0 t (Ref. 1394)

Environment
Pelagic; oceanodromous (Ref. 75906); depth range 80 - 500 m (Ref. 1005)

Climate / Range
Polar; 90°N - 90°S, 180°W - 180°E

Distribution
North Atlantic and North Pacific: Balaenoptera musculus musculus.

North Atlantic [IUCN 2010 (Ref. 84930): VU, D1] and North Pacific [IUCN 2010 (Ref. 84930): LR/cd.
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

The largest whales of the world's oceans. They can be seen from the equator to the pack ice edges in both hemispheres, with most poleward intrusions in both hemispheres in summer. Some are resident, others are migratory. Feeds on krill (Ref. 1394). Feeds at depths less than 100 m (Ref. 1005). From the time faster catcher boats and explosive harpoons made them catchable, blue whales were hunted relentlessly from the late 19th through the mid 20th centuries. As the largest whales, they were the most sought after of the rorquals. Although most populations remain well below pre-exploitation levels, some stocks (such as those that feed off California) have shown encouraging signs of recovery since protection by the International Whaling Commission (IWC) in 1965. At least in the eastern North Atlantic and the eastern North Pacific, numbers appear to be on the rise (Ref. 1394). They can be seen from the equator to the pack ice edges in both hemispheres, with most poleward intrusions in both hemispheres in summer. Some are resident, others are migratory. Feeds on krill (Ref. 1394). Feeds at depths less than 100 m (Ref. 1005). Common birth length: 7 cm (Ref. 75906).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 114614)

  Endangered (EN) (A1abd)

CITES status (Ref. 94142)

Threat to humans




Human uses
Fisheries: commercial
FAO(fisheries: production) | FisheriesWiki | Sea Around Us |

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Predators
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources
BHL | BOLD Systems | Check for other websites | Check FishWatcher | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(fisheries: species profile; publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GOBASE | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | National databases | PubMed | Scirus | Sea Around Us | FishBase | Tree of Life | uBio | uBio RSS | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimation of some characteristics with mathematical models

Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
Very high vulnerability (79 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown